Tag Archives: nurses

Nurses with Popsicles

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Transitioning into the Francis Building wasn’t easy, but it was the smoothest bumpy road we’ve ridden. The Mayo Clinic’s St. Mary’s Hospital has everything a girl could want. Disney movies on demand, Mac ‘n Cheese and nurses to accommodate. Without the incredibly attentive support staff, I don’t believe the EEG would’ve been successful, but would have instead fallen into the discarded pile of our failed EEG attempts.

I held my breath when the EEG techs unwrapped her head to attach and verify the leads. I was certain they wouldn’t get her head wrapped again. Savannah wasn’t pleased, but astoundingly, she let them probe her head and re-glue what needed to be done. Although, I think it helped that one of the techs knew Larry, the giant stuffed cucumber laying in Savannah’s bed. It’s always good to have a friend in common.

Then we got down to business and changed from the horrible hospital gown into a very stylish, very comfortable, very hot pink swimsuit. What else would a fashionista wear for a hospital stay?

With A Bug’s Life on the hospital tv, Mickey Mouse Christmas on our portable DVD player, Larry and friends in bed and comfortably dressed, there was only on thing missing. Mac ‘n Cheese.

I felt a bit foolish when ordering the food. (Yes, St. Mary’s has room service. You are given a menu when shown your room.) My first order was for Mac ‘n Cheese and two orders of French fries. I’m sure I looked like the conscientious mother. What the voice-waitress didn’t know what that the fries were also for her bored brother, who had been a trooper on the sidelines for the day.

Shortly after the food arrived, so did the giggles. I can’t say I’m happy about the food I let her eat during our stay (2 helpings of Mac ‘n Cheese, two sugar cookies, fries, a chicken sandwich, angel food cake and a muffin). I’m not sure if it was to keep her compliant or out of guilt from the circumstances, but twenty-four hours of gluttony is minor compared to a lifetime of having those EEG results.

St. Mary’s staff was amazing. Within the first few hours, two EEG doctors visited to be certain I knew what to expect and that the goal was to get the EEG. They would do whatever they needed to keep Savannah happy and compliant and all nurses had been made aware of this. An extra nurse was assigned to Savannah as a “sitter.” The sitter could be either in our room or right outside the door, it was my preference, in case an episode hit.

Which it did.

Savannah decided it was time to leave. Of course, we couldn’t. Hence, the episode. It started as anger, then a melt down, then I pressed the panic button. I was wrapped in the EEG cables with Savannah trying to push me to the door, but actually pushing me into the bed and floor, screaming and crying all the while. The nurse, again I wish I could remember his name – Mike, maybe – came rushing in. He calmed her while I unraveled me, then he placed her on the bed, which had been padded in anticipation. We both talked to her, but she screamed and cried and continued to beat her head against the padding. Once she realized the padding was secure, she began to punch at Mike, but he took it and continued to talk to her, no more fazed than if a feather had drifted into him. Then she found the part of the bed that had not been padded. She leapt for it head first, but Mike’s hand was already there, waiting to catch her forehead. I handed him a pillow, and he caught her head with it each time she lunged. Over and over with her barbaric yell, he never flinched. After roughly ten minutes, she left her head on the pillow. Her eyes filled with water that trickled down her nose and cheeks. He continued to cradle her head until the sniffles had passed, and she had regained herself.

Everything after that moment was surprisingly easy. Child Life came in with crafts tailored to her preference and ability. Favorite Disney and Pixar cartoons ran back to back. There were sticker crafts and coloring pages and puzzles and selfies with Larry, until she finally drifted to sleep.

The sitter came in and watched over Savannah so I could sleep. I figured I wouldn’t be able to sleep, especially with a stranger sitting in the room. But maybe that’s why it was so easy. I honestly couldn’t stay awake. It may have been the strenuous drive there. It may have been the stress of the day. It may have been the knowledge that I was off duty. If Savannah woke screaming or laughing at three in the morning, there was someone to take care of it. I may have easily slept just because I could.

Of course Savannah decided to sleep an unusually typical eight hours. She woke sweetly and giggly. There were a few tears when she realized the leads were still on, but they were quickly alleviated with cuddles. We ordered muffins for breakfast (yes St. Mary’s room service even has gluten-free muffins!) and played educational matching games. The moment Savannah became anxious to leave, the nurse answered her request for a red Popsicle, and the morning continued smoothly. Nurses with Popsicles are awesome.

Savannah had just started her red Popsicle when the doctors arrived. Both EEG doctors came in for the results. They were thorough and addressed every concern, yet it didn’t take them long to deliver the news: The EEG was normal. There were no seizures haunting her dreams, and the episode had nothing to do with brain activity. Her EKG was also normal. The irregularity was confirmed as a reaction to the sedation.

Savannah looked good.

I could feel the huge sigh of relieve escape, but despair quickly filled the space. It was another non-answer.

Our Thursday appointment with Dr. R had been moved up to that afternoon. We were released by 10:00am with instructions to return at 1:00pm to meet with the great medical detective and discover which path was next.

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Smoking Caterpillars, Vanishing Cats and Humming Girls

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My daughter is so brave.
We entered the Mayo Clinic’s St. Mary’s hospital early Monday morning. We rode the shuttle from the hotel with a suitcase, a purse of toys, an iPad and a giant stuffed cucumber. We were admitted and taken back, past the oil-painted nuns,up the east elevators and to the prepping room in Joseph. She was anxious and edgy, but we made it through the waiting. She did try to escape a few times, but we made it.

She has had two other MRI’s, both with sedation, but I doubt she remembers them or if she does, I doubt she correlated those experiences with this one. I wonder what she thought as we forced her to change clothes and refused her her red shoes with polka dots. I made promises to stay with her until she was asleep and to be there when she wakes, but how comforting does she find that? I told her they were going to help her take a nap with medicine that would give her wonderful dreams like Alice in Wonderland with smoking caterpillars and vanishing cats, but she only anxiously hummed as she was wheeled down the chilled labyrinth corridors. Not having eaten, she begged me for dum dums and red apples, and I promised her all of those as soon as she woke from her nap, never knowing if there were red apples at hospital.

St. Mary’s was incredibly accommodating, allowing me back during sedation. They cooed over her iPad case and polka dotted shoes (which they decided to let her wear). She resisted the mask but once on, quickly breathed her way into a deep sleep.

We were told to expect to wait three to four hours, but after getting a pager and eating lunch and moving rooms, after two pages to the desk for phone calls from nurses and finding the monitor to watch her progress and borrowing a joke from the jar with her brother, it took no time at all.

She was restless but mostly drowsy. The sedation hung heavy around her, clinging to her flesh. Moments after I told her I was there, she surcommbed to the drugs and drifted back into the fog. Her head was bandaged, an attempt to protect the EEG leads. I knew they would be there but wasn’t prepared for how terribly tragic it would actually look. Her entire head was bandaged, her lips pale and trembling, her skin frigid to touch. On occasion, one eye would part and aimlessly roam the room before shutting again, only to let the other eye repeat the action a few minutes later.

She continued to kick the heated blankets off, but her body trembled mercilessly. “Her temperature was down to 35 (95 Fahrenheit) when they brought her out, so we’re trying to keep the blankets on her,” a nurse informed me.

Not only had her temperature dropped unexpectedly low, but so had her heart rate. With all of her sedations, there has never been a complication. I remained perfectly calm, as I held her hand and spoke with the nurses, but my heart thudded against my sternum. A cardiologist was called in. He had already come by a few times to check on her, and continued to monitor her by phone. One thing I have learned about the Mayo, there is never time for a patient to want. Phone calls and texts are made as soon as a need arrives, expected or not. Even though her heart rate was increasing (it was up to 50 by the time I arrived), the beat was irregular. By the time the decision was made for an EKG, Savannah was awake and irritated. She tugged at her finger monitor, grasped at her I.V. and clawed at her bandaged head, fighting to sit up with an animalistic whine.

It was a nursing student from Indiana, interning at Mayo, who had the brilliant idea to fetch an iPad. I wish I was better with names. I wish I could thank her properly. I wish I could give her the credit she’s due. I can, however, be thankful that Savannah’s MRI occurred during her ten weeks with Mayo.

Drowsily, Savannah pushed the nursing student out of the way and began to rummage through the apps. She fussed and hummed and distractedly swatted at the EKG tech, like a bothersome bug, but she sat through the EKG focused on an app, except for the occasional disgruntled look.

With her finger monitor removed, a team of nurses and the iPad still on her lap, we headed up the elevators, back through the labyrinth, down to Francis and our new room for the next twenty-four to forty-eight hours. She had done it. Savannah had made it through the MRI, not fully understanding, at least I don’t believe she fully understood, it was just the beginning.


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